Jim Blasingame

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Following the interview with Steve DelBianco on Internet governance, Jim Blasingame talks about the future of the Internet using a current United Nations analogy. It isn't pretty. Small business owners must get involved in this debate.
What's the best attitude to have in 2009? Jim Blasingame talks about critical 2009 attitudes, like "positive reality," discretion is the better part of valor" and "winning by surviving."
Jim Blasingame reveals the rest of his 2009 predictions, including how they will likely impact small businesses. See the previous Archive for Jim's other predictions.
As he has done for several years, Jim Blasingame looks into his Small Business Advocate Crystal Ball and reveals several of the things he predicts will happen in 2009.
Focusing on what he calls "positive reality," Jim Blasingame talks about what he thinks is in store for small businesses in 2009 - the good, the bad and the ugly.
Judge Bill Huss was an outstanding member of Jim Blasingame's Brain Trust, who passed away November 2008. Leslie Kossoff was a long-time friend and admirer of Judge Huss and she joins Jim to celebrate the life of this great American jurist and thinker.
For the past several years, Jim Blasingame has made annual predictions. But unlike many prognosticators, Jim returns at the end of the year to compare his predictions to reality. Listen as Jim reveals his 2008 predictions and his score.
In the long-term, will government intervention be good or bad for free market capitalism? Jim Blasingame explains why he things government bail-outs are a blessing that could turn into a curse, in time.
If the government has been so complicit in creating much of our economic crisis, why do we think they can help solve it? Jim Blasingame details many of the problems government has caused and why he thinks its intervention will ultimately be a problem.
As he has done since 1997, Jim Blasingame broadcasts live on Christmas day. In this segment he begins by defending his reputation as a scrooge and wraps up by recognizing, thanking and praising our men and women who are standing a post, away from home, on Christmas day.